Creative Craftsman - Cape Cod LIFE Publications

Creative Craftsman

With a nod toward a famous California style, Chris Hereford renovates a home with special coastal touches.

Photo by Eric Roth

Photo by Eric Roth

“It’s not everyday you come across a client like this,” says Chris Hereford of HMD Architects in Harwich. “She really wanted to go the extra distance to create a home that was special.” The original house, which sits just off of Chatham’s Main Street, was a mishmash of styles—a little Greek Revival, a little Federal. “We did a total renovation of the house,” says Hereford. The dark, closed-off spaces did not work for the family. “There are often three generations under one roof here during the summer months,” says Hereford. Hereford, who had worked with the client on other house projects in the past, designed new spaces for the family—two additions—as well as adding much needed curb appeal and natural light to the home.

Photo by Eric Roth

Photo by Eric Roth

“We gave the exterior a new face,” says Hereford, who chose a more contemporary design for the old house. He took elements of the Craftsman style first developed by early 20th-century California architects Greene and Greene, the design duo most noted for Pasadena’s 1908 Gamble House. The house achieves a horizontal quality intermixed with Japanese flourishes, such as the flared front porch roof. To maximize natural light entering the home, Hereford incorporated a gable and a barrel roof dormer to the front facade. The barrel dormer acts as the clerestory windows for the living room, bringing much needed light into the space. A band of three windows also bring in additional sunlight. Not forgetting the other facades, Hereford popped in clerestory windows and additional barrel vaulted dormers to the side and back of the house, again, to bring in as much natural light as possible.

Although the exterior gives a nod to the California Craftsman style, the cladding is all Cape. Gray shingles cover the exterior. To add interest, Hereford finished shingled corners and tapered Craftsman-style columns with a double basket weave design. He also employed bands of scalloped and diamond shingles. A subtle wave motif—first realized in the arched dormered windows—was introduced throughout the design to reflect the rhythm of Chatham Harbor and the open ocean beyond.

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