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It Was Unbelievable

Cape residents, weather experts recall the New England Hurricane of 1938.

Ginny Dunham Hutchinson was 14 and a student at the Barnstable Senior/Junior High School when she and some friends walked to the beach on the afternoon of September 22, 1938. Read more…

Sailing On: Centerville museum exhibit focuses on Donald McKay’s life work

The mastermind behind some of America’s fastest clipper ships is the focus of an exhibit at the Centerville Historical Museum.

For one brief, glorious period, prior to a tidal wave of steam-powered boats, the swiftest, tallest, most beautiful sailing ships ever built rode the crest of popularity on the high seas. Read more…

Scenes From a Time Gone By

A vintage photography exhibit at the Cahoon Museum of American Art showcases Cape Cod in days past.

A lot can change over the course of a century, and nowhere is this truer than in the realm of photography. Read more…

Hours of Gold, Hours of Lead

Falmouth’s legendary Highfield and Tanglewood Halls set the stage for the rise—and tragic fall—of the famous Beebe family.

Certain family names have been connected with towns on Cape Cod and the Islands for centuries. The Snows of Orleans, the Coffins and Starbucks of Nantucket, and the Nickersons and Atwoods of Chatham all have legendary connections to their respective towns. Read more…

Chatham Treasures

Richard Kahn started collecting antiques at the age of eight. It was the mid-1950s, and Kahn scored a fabulous bit of Americana; an autographed photo of the writer Mark Twain. Even as a young boy, Kahn knew he had hit on something big. “At that age, I was being told about The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and other Twain works,” Kahn says. His interior switch was flipped, and, as Kahn says, “I really got immersed in antiques and collectibles.” Read more…

Language of the Past

Hutker Architects learns the vocabulary of an antique Colonial for a harmonious new addition to a historical structure.

A wonderful piece of history sits serenely on Lower Mill Pond in Brewster’s historical Factory Village. The Nathaniel Winslow House—also known by locals as the High Brewster Inn—was built in 1738 near the gristmill and famous herring run. A true Colonial design, the structure has a center chimney and center hall flanked by two parlors (now both bedrooms) each with original pine-paneled walls and fireplaces; the original keeping room (now a living/music room) is located along the length of the original house. This room also has period paneling and a great hearth used for cooking in the 18th century. Read more…

Footnotes and Cannonballs

Far from the frontlines of the War of 1812, the Cape and Islands still endured conflict along their shores.

Less than 30 years after gaining independence from the British Empire, the still fledgling United States found itself in conflict with its former rulers once again. The British interfered with trade, sovereignty, and the territorial expansion of the United States, pushing President James Madison to bring a list of grievances to Congress on June 1, 1812. Within two weeks, the United States was at war. Read more…

A Beautiful Blend A Beautiful Blend

It’s not too often one comes across a piece of old Cape Cod so well preserved that experiencing it feels like a step back in time, but the 18th-century Benjamin Godfrey House on Stage Harbor Road in Chatham is such a place. Evoking the feeling of a bygone era, the Cape-style dwelling is situated on an acre of undulating lawns, which feature moss-covered stone walls, an old barn, an ancient fruit orchard, and views to Mill Pond. The Benjamin Godfrey house was first deeded in 1789. Although there are no documents showing the actual build date, Smith believes the house was erected circa 1750. Benjamin Godfrey operated the town gristmill, which was once located north of the property and was moved to Chatham’s Chase Park. Godfrey lived in the house until he passed away in 1818. Read more…

Room with a View

For 45 years, a one-room waterfront shack in West Dennis provided a getaway for a group of Marlborough outdoorsmen.

It was called “The Shooting Shanty,” and weathered, sepia photographs taken at the turn of the 20th century tell its story in a series of vignettes. One photo shows a spartan building with game birds hanging over the entrance, middle-aged men dressed in camouflage posing proudly with their heads thrust toward the sky, rifles resting at their sides. In another photo, they relax around a table—playing cards or reading or entering notes into a journal. In still another, they look at the camera, comfortable on rough bunk beds.

Room with a View Read more…

Time Lapse & Cape Maps

Looking at the history of Cape Cod and the Islands through a cartographic lens

On Chatham’s Main Street, past the bustling strips of gift shops and restaurants, there lies a treasure trove of history. With an unassuming buttercup yellow exterior, the Maps of Antiquity shop seems to creak under the weight of thousands of maps. Some maps are yellowed and cracked with age, some carefully restored and framed. Some hang on every wall of the two-room shop, while the majority—organized by locale and vintage—sit in dozens of print racks, begging to be flipped through.

Time Lapse & Cape Maps Read more…

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