The barn settles into the back corner of the tidy, but lush lot that is in close enough proximity to hear the Cotuit Kettleer games throughout the warm summer nights. It provides the seclusion the Dinardos want for their guests, but is also easily accessible, as it is mere feet from the screened porch where everyone seems to gather.

But, as any creative person understands, the project list is rarely complete. One day as Jeff was tidying another corner of the lot Maria noticed that he was thinking something through. “She asked me what I was doing,” Jeff explains. “I told her I was thinking it would be a good place for a fire pit. She said, “No, I want a fireplace.’ A fireplace? I had never thought of that, I couldn’t even imagine it. But she explained her vision and it sounded like an awesome idea. So we contacted a mason to give us a quote. Well, it was so expensive, we almost gave up on the idea, but I decided to go to the stone yard to see what I might be able to figure out on my own.

“A young man there noticed I was trying to figure something out so he asked me what I was doing. I explained it to him and he got so excited he asked if he could come by and see the space. He thought it could work within our budget and he was right. We just love it.”

And that’s how a new relationship with Brian Boley of M.B. Masonry in Sandwich was born. Boley got to work creating the reality of the vision that Maria initially explained to Jeff. “He was a true artisan,” says Maria. “It was like he was working on a jigsaw puzzle. And then at the end he thought he was finished, but I told him it didn’t have the cap I wanted. He got so excited and said ‘Oh my gosh, that is going to be so hard, but I’m going to do it!’ He came back with a small crane and carefully, I mean carefully placed the final slab across the top.” 

The result is a majestic outdoor fieldstone fireplace with a raised hearth and two knee walls that spool off of each side to make a half circle that embraces a seating area for six to twelve people comfortably. Of course, Jeff sourced the crowning detail—a dark steel medallion depicting sea life that was created by a Haitian artist who cut it from the top of an oil drum.