Handed Down Home

A 150-year-old historic home has become a place to create memories for generations to come

In 1873 Elias Burrows built a home in Cotuit for his new wife and their future family. It was a traditional Greek revival farmhouse with a welcoming portico entrance positioned asymmetrically on the right of the front façade that faced Cotuit’s Main Street. From the sparse collection of history available about Mr. Burrows, it appears he was a fairly ordinary citizen. Sadly, the family he prepared for never fulfilled the dreams he must have held for their future in his new home. A daughter named Sarah was born in 1873, but is recorded as deceased in 1875, and his wife Temple Phinney Harlow Burrows apparently died five years later at the age of 36. It is easy to imagine his whitewashed home standing proudly in a landscape of the Cape long ago—a time when the majority of trees had been sourced to build the structures of the New World—and a photo captured from that time would certainly have been black and white, devoid of the rich history that is the lifeblood of Cotuit today.

The Elias Burrows homestead, circa 1873, was built for a family in Cotuit. 150 years later it has had several owners who have created generations of memories. The current owners are adding their own creative and personal touches to make the home their own. A new barn in the back of the home welcomes friends and family most every weekend.

Today, the Burrows homestead still stands and has evolved since the historical days of the post Civil War era; it has accumulated 150 years of history as it has sheltered and protected the lives of its various inhabitants. The current owners, Jeff and Maria Dinardo are the most recent stewards of the property and one can’t help but think that everything has led to this moment.

Jeff loves to look at houses, he’s always spying Open House listings and trying to convince me to go. I told him we were on vacation, and I wanted to just enjoy the Cape and relax. I think I finally gave in by saying that we would go look at it

“We weren’t even in the market for a Cape house,” recalls Jeff, “but we were on vacation for a week in Cotuit and I saw this listing.” Maria concurs, but emphasizes how they really weren’t looking. “Jeff loves to look at houses, he’s always spying Open House listings and trying to convince me to go. I told him we were on vacation, and I wanted to just enjoy the Cape and relax. I think I finally gave in by saying that we would go look at it.” As it turns out, that was an assent that would change their lives going forward.