Cape & Islands Architects and Builders

Courtesy of Hutker Architects

Courtesy of Hutker Architects

Build once, well” is the philosophy that guides architect Mark Hutker in his life’s work, and it is a philosophy exemplified in one of his favorite projects.

Duin Huis, a home nested into a sand dune on the Atlantic Ocean, also happens to be one of the most restricted and regulated properties that Hutker says he and his team at Hutker Architects have ever worked on. The firm created “a jewel box of a home,” he says, with just concrete, driftwood, bronze, and glass and made the most of all 1,800 square feet of space. From designing rooms that connect to one another and a “spectacular” oceanfront environment, to wrapping the home in storm-protecting shutters, to including a retractable 8-foot skylight that leads to a roof deck—complete with a built-in chaise and soaking tub—Hutker crafted a home he hopes is timeless.

“My goal is to create houses that are worthy of preservation. Adaptive spaces go a long way toward that goal,” he explains. “We often design houses that have multiple objectives; they need to accommodate large groups when extended families gather, and they also need to feel comfortable when only one or two people are at home. When we accomplish this, the home will be more likely to stand the test of time.”

Mark Hutker Crop

Photography by Ryan Alcaidnho

Serving Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard, and greater New England, Hutker founded his architecture firm in 1985, developing it into what is now a highly regarded company of 40 professionals based in Falmouth, Vineyard Haven, and Boston. Hutker, a native of Indiana, says he came to Cape Cod for the opportunity “to create meaningful architecture in an area that is deeply connected to history, community, and nature.” In 30 years of practice, he says he and his team have developed a comprehensive understanding of—and respect for—“the architectural DNA” of the region.

“Our New England ancestors didn’t have time to fuss with their homes, so they made wooden structures that were durable, low-maintenance, and energy efficient. That’s where we start,” Hutker explains. “But we aren’t working 100 years ago. People live differently today and want more open, connected living spaces. We have ever-changing technologies at our disposal.”

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