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When the temperature drops, go take a hike!

2015

Photography by Dan Cutrona

Head of the Meadow Beach, Truro

Head of the Meadow Beach in Truro represents the epitome of a Cape Cod beach: it’s long, beautiful, sandy, and reaches out into the Atlantic. A popular spot in summer, the beach, which is part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, offers a different type of beauty in the off season; following a dusting of snow, for example, the 100-foot dunes resemble mountains.

“The National Seashore is open year round, weather permitting,” says Susan Moynihan of the Cape Cod National Seashore. “A heavy snow may close roads and parking areas but with enough snow some people enjoy cross-country skiing.”

The beach area also features a few recreational options for visitors: a two-mile bike trail and two hiking trails: (Continued on next page)
Small’s Swamp Trail and Pilgrim Spring Trail. The bike trail is flat, paved, and travels along the edge of a salt meadow, ending at Pilgrim Heights. The hiking trails are loops, each measuring about three-quarters of a mile and requiring about 30 minutes to complete. Both trails wind through scenic, forested areas and are not considered strenuous.

According to the National Park Service, the beach itself features three distinct geographical regions: a freshwater meadow, the outer beach, and pine uplands that culminate at the High Head bluff which offers great views of Provincetown. To the north of the area and at low tide, the shipwreck of the Frances, which sunk in a gale in December of 1872, can be seen from the beach.

“A lot of people like to visit in the winter,” Moynihan says. “Many people like to walk the beach or view the ocean waves from overlooks (during storms) to see wind and waves pummel the shoreline.”

Traveling north on Route 6, take the Cape Cod Light/Highland Road exit. Proceed one-quarter mile north, and you will see the Head of the Meadow Beach sign on the right. Once you turn right, it’s two miles to the beach. Maps of the trail system are available at nps.gov.



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