Laverty kitchen

Shaker cabinets complement the elegant millwork.

Two islands may seem to be an indulgent detail, but in a kitchen this large, that accommodates an active family such as this, both islands serve distinct functions and therefore don’t exaggerate the design. “Everyone was surprised we were putting two islands in the kitchen. It is not a popular notion in New England, but it makes a lot of sense, particularly for this kitchen,” Connor explains.

The use of materials on the countertop distinguishes the two islands and thereby their intended use. One, intended mostly to serve as a dining spot, is topped with a rich mahogany, and the other, used mostly for food prep and serving, features a hard-working granite with a leathered finish and an elegant laminated Roman ogee over a square-eased edge, fabricated and installed by Timeless Stoneworks. “We did a lot of repetition of design details,” Levitt explains. “We kept the columns on both islands to give them similarity, and the detail is repeated on either side of the sink. Then, the way we have the stepped design on the hood also mimics the look of the columns.” Levitt goes on to explain that the addition of two seats at the end of the work island was a later decision. “It helps to scale down the kitchen,” she says. “In the rare instance that you just have two people who may want to perch, have coffee and a light breakfast, it is the perfect spot for that sort of thing.” Judy Laverty confirms that rarity when she explains the functionality of the seating island. “At Thanksgiving I will set that island, complete with a tablecloth, and it becomes the kids table; even though the grandchildren are now adults, they seem to like to have their own spot.”